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   TheDean's Newsletter

photo of Dr. Gary Pollack
From College of Pharmacy Dean
Gary Pollack, Ph.D.
October 2014
In This Issue...
Dear Friends and Colleagues:

One of the best things about my position as dean of the WSU College of Pharmacy is that I have the flexibility to continue to work with students in our Doctor of Pharmacy and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs. I can devote time to these activities, which I enjoy immensely, because we have an outstanding team of associate deans, chairs, and directors who share in the administrative and leadership responsibilities for our college. It is a luxury that I am certain many of my dean colleagues around the country do not have.

This semester, I have the good fortune of teaching separate sections of our introductory pharmacokinetics course (my specialty area) to our first- and second-year students. There are two sections of this course because we are in the midst of a modest restructuring of our curriculum. Pharmacokinetics is being moved from the second year to the first year of the curriculum to support our four-semester sequence in integrated pharmacology, consistent with the central role of pharmacokinetics in contemporary clinical pharmacology.

Pharmacokineticists have, for many years, debated the appropriate place for this course in the pharmacy curriculum, and many have expressed the opinion that first-year students simply are not ready for such a rigorous, quantitative course. We have the opportunity this year to test that hypothesis. Although we are only about a third of the way through the semester, the first-year students have a slight edge on their more experienced colleagues. We will report the outcome of this curricular experiment at the end of the year.

Our curricular restructuring has accomplished several important goals. Pharmacology now is integrated with pathophysiology and medicinal chemistry, and is sequenced with pharmacotherapy. We have enhanced coursework in traditional medicinal chemistry as well as the disciplines underpinning drug discovery and development. Most importantly, we have doubled the opportunities within the curriculum for elective coursework, with time set aside each semester in the second and third year to pursue electives. We believe that these changes and others will assist each student in building a truly outstanding foundation to support her or his individual career aspirations.

I look forward to sharing more on our continued pursuit of excellence in pharmacy education as the academic year progresses.

With best wishes for the fall season,

Gary M. Pollack



Gary M. Pollack
Dean
Washington State University College of Pharmacy

 
 
 
WSU Pharmacist Alyson Blum
First pharmacy obstetrics residency underway at Spokane hospital
Dr. Alyson Blum
 
Alyson Blum, Pharm.D.  
At first, the physicians who were visiting their pregnant patients at the hospital did not understand why a pharmacist had moved into an office on the labor and delivery floor and was associating with them, but Alyson Blum quickly summarized her value.

She told the physicians that as a pharmacist, she is skilled at finding and reviewing literature to support medication decisions, so as they got used to seeing her with the medical residents and fellows, they started asking her to review the literature on drug-related decisions.

“It was an easy way for them to engage me,” Blum said. “My assignment for this first year of this residency is to ‘look, listen and learn.’”

Blum is breaking new ground as the first pharmacy resident in obstetrics at the WSU College of Pharmacy. She talks on the phone weekly with Gerald G. Briggs, a 1968 alumnus of the College from southern California who is an expert in obstetrics pharmacy and who co-created a textbook on the subject.

Blum’s residency was created after Briggs identified the benefit of pharmacists working on the team with OB doctors and nurses. Briggs personally funded the one-year OB pharmacy residency with the goal to demonstrate the value of a pharmacist on the OB team and to develop a “best practice” model of care that can then be duplicated in other hospitals.

“He quizzes me so he can focus my learning for the next week,” Blum said.

Briggs spoke personally to two of the physicians at the Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) Clinic in Spokane to explain the idea for the obstetrics residency, Blum said. The other person instrumental in creating the residency was Linda Garrelts MacLean, an associate dean at the College, who teamed up with the director of pharmacy at Providence Sacred Hear Medical Center (PSHMC) to design the residency.

All the legwork was done when Blum started the residency in mid-July, and she dove into learning about obstetric pharmacy from the online course Briggs and MacLean developed a few years ago from Briggs’ textbook.

“We get a few lectures in pharmacy school about it, but this is a very specialized field and there is a lot to know,” Blum said.
Alyson Blum at her residency location at Sacred Heart Medical Center
 
Alyson Blum at the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Clinic located at the PSHMC complex in Spokane, Wash.  
She will give lectures in three classes in the Doctor of Pharmacy program this year and help a third-year student create a formal presentation based on an obstetrics patient. But she is spending most of her time at The MFM Clinic where, in addition to learning how she can fit as part of the obstetrics team, she is designing a research project intended to explore the value a clinical pharmacy specialist brings to the obstetrics team.

Blum said the nurses on the floor have been “welcoming and wonderful and excited to have me here.” The physicians are learning what she has to offer and she now goes to their journal clubs with the medical residents and OB fellows.

“I am grateful to the Maternal-Fetal Medicine perinatologists for their work to incorporate me into their team,” Blum said. "It has been a rewarding experience."

Blum is from Newbury Park, Calif., and moved to Seattle where she obtained her bachelor’s degree in cellular and molecular biology, with a minor in chemistry and quantitative science, from the University of Washington. She continued living in Seattle for another six years and worked as a pharmacy tech at Costco before pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy degree at WSU.

She heard about this new residency shortly before graduating in May.

“It’s really amazing to be at the forefront of something new,” Blum said. “It has been a steep learning curve and I am still learning, but I know I am making a difference.”

Briggs’ textbook is titled, “Diseases, Complications, and Drug Therapy in Obstetrics.” The online course, by the same name, can be found on the College’s web site at: http://www.pharmacy.wsu.edu/online/index.html.
 
Danial E. Baker
WSU pharmacy professor appointed to drug advisory committee for FDA
Dr. Danial E. Baker
 
Danial Baker, Pharm.D., FASHP, FASCP  
Danial Baker, a WSU pharmacy professor, was appointed to serve a four-year term on the United States Food and Drug Administration’s Arthritis Advisory Committee beginning on September 21.

The purpose of the committee is to advise the FDA commissioner on the safety and effectiveness of drug products that are submitted to the FDA to be approved for human use. This committee specifically reviews the marketed and investigational drug therapies that treat arthritis, rheumatism, and related diseases. Baker was selected by the FDA to be one of 11 voting members on this committee.

“I look forward to representing our profession and Washington State University through this important role with the FDA in service to the American public,” Baker said.

Baker will periodically travel to the FDA in Washington D.C. to attend meetings where he and other committee members will represent the interests of consumers and consumer organizations in the reviews and recommendations they submit to the FDA commissioner.

Baker previously served as a member of the National Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee for Medco Health Solutions for over 18 years. He is a pharmacotherapy professor and the associate dean for professional and continuing education at the WSU College of Pharmacy where he teaches student pharmacists on drug therapy, drug information, and evidence based medicine.

WSU Drug Information Center
 
Danial Baker (right) with Ross Bindler (left) and Anne Kim (center), the two new Doctor of Pharmacy PGY1 specialty residents in drug information.  
Baker is also the director of the WSU Drug Information Center where Baker supervises two post-graduate Doctor of Pharmacy residents specializing in drug information and pharmacy education. The center serves as a reference resource on drug-related questions to health care providers and is the primary support unit for Wolters Kluwer Health’s The Formulary Monograph Service (FMS). Wolters Kluwer Health is a drug and health information publisher, the FMS is a resource used in the formulary decision making process for hospitals and managed care systems on recently released and investigational drugs.

Baker has received numerous awards and honors including the Smith, Kline & French Laboratories Award for Superior Achievement in Clinical Pharmacy, the Washington State Pharmacy Association Pharmacist of the Year, a WSU Faculty Excellence Award, and has been included in Who's Who in American Education, and Who’s Who in the World. He is a fellow of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists and the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists.
 
WSU hosts study abroad pharmacy program in Spokane
Washington is a popular annual visit for Mukogawa Women's University student pharmacists
Mukogawa Women's University visits the WSU College of Pharmacy
 
Student pharmacists from MWU participate in a human patient simulation exercise with WSU student pharmacists during their visit to Spokane this summer.  
The WSU College of Pharmacy hosted 12 Japanese study abroad student pharmacists on the WSU Health Sciences campus in Spokane this summer to introduce them to American clinical pharmacy practices.

The fifth-year student pharmacists from Mukogawa Women’s University (MWU) got to interact with WSU student pharmacists in exercises that introduced them to basic physical assessment techniques that utilized the WSU human patient simulation manikin “SimMan”.

Student pharmacists practiced taking blood pressure, measuring body mass index, listening to heart sounds, and role-played interacting with patients in a clinical pharmacy setting.

“This kind of manikin simulation-based training is not something the Mukogawa students have had the opportunity to practice with before,” said Brenda Bray, who is the main WSU liaison for the MWU study abroad program.

College of Pharmacy pharmacotherapy faculty members Lisa Woodard and Jill Morin have helped Bray coordinate the annual visit from the study abroad group since 2011, after MWU approached WSU about adding the human patient simulation piece to their four-week study abroad program.

“It was very interesting,” wrote one Mukogawa student pharmacists after her visit in 2013. “I had a good time. I can’t speak English, but I can listen, so I learned many things. I want to talk about today’s experience to my friends. [The] WSU Pharm.D. students were very helpful. Thank you!”

This year, study abroad students also participated side-by-side with WSU student pharmacists in the WSU Week of Welcome activities, which took them on an extensive tour of the WSU Health Sciences campus and its teaching and research facilities.

“I enjoy watching the positive cross-cultural interactions between the student pharmacists as they work together,” Bray said. “It is always a favorite event for the WSU student pharmacists every year.”

The WSU College of Pharmacy in Spokane is just one stop on the study abroad tour for the Mukogawa students, who stay at the Mukogawa Fort Wright Institute in Spokane. The MWU Fort Wright Institute has been an official branch campus of MWU since 1994. Mukogawa Women’s University was founded in Nishinomiya, Japan, in 1939.

"The program includes courses in English specifically focused on pharmacy practices in the U.S. They visit hospitals, pharmacies and the WSU simulation lab, and a WSU professor, Bill Fassett, gives lectures to the students." said Janet Sahlin, the MWU Fort Wright Institute director of academic programs. "At the end of their course of study, students give a symposium on pharmacy practices in Japan and the U.S. On their way back to Japan they stop in Seattle to visit the UW College of Pharmacy for a tour and lecture."

Other College News
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP
Publications
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences Adjunct Faculty Shelley Chambers Fox published the book, “Remington Education: Pharmaceutics,” in July through the publisher Pharmaceutical Press.
  • Pharmacotherapy Professor and Associate Dean for Professional and Continuing Education Danial E. Baker, Pharmacotherapy Research Associate and Specialty Resident in Drug Information Practice Jasen Cong, and Pharmacotherapy Research Associate and Specialty Resident in Drug Information Practice Kyle Ingram were highlighted authors by the journal Hospital Pharmacy in their newsletter, "Where these the Top 5 articles YOU read this summer?"
  • Pharmacotherapy Associate Professor Joshua J. Neumiller and 14 co-authors published, "Diabetic Kidney Disease: A report from an ADA Consensus Conference," in the American Journal Kidney Diseases, a publication of the National Kidney Foundation (2014;64(4):510-533). read article
  • Joshua Neumiller and 14 co-authors published, "Diabetic Kidney Disease: A report from an ADA Consensus Conference," in the journal Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association (2014;37:2864-2883).
  • Pharmacotherapy Clinical Professor Terri Levien and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Soluble ferric pyrophosphate citrate (Triferic): Preliminary Evaluation," in Wolters Kluwer Health’s The Formulary Monograph Service (FMS) in August. Wolters Kluwer Health is a drug and health information provider, the FMS is a resource database for hospitals and managed care pharmacists that provides information on recently released and investigational drugs.
  • Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Vedolizumab (Entyvio): updated evaluation," in the FMS in August.
  • Terri Levien and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Posaconazole Intravenous (Noxafil)," in the FMS in August.
  • Jasen Cong and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Vorapaxar (Zontivity): updated evaluation," in the FMS in August.
  • Kyle Ingram and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Dalbavancin (Dalvance): updated evaluation," in the FMS in August.
  • Danial Baker published, "Drug Utilization Evaluation – Dalbavancin," in the FMS in August.
  • Danial Baker and one co-author published "Drug Evaluation – Umeclidinium (Incruse Ellipta)," in the FMS in September.
  • Kyle Ingram and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Tedizolid (Sivextro): updated evaluation," in the FMS in September.
  • Kyle Ingram and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Siltuximab (Sylvant)," in the FMS in September.
  • Jasen Cong and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Ceritinib (Zykadia): updated evaluation," in the FMS in September.
  • Kyle Ingram and Danial Baker published, "Drug Evaluation – Omega-3-carboxylic acids (Epanova)," in the FMS in September.
  • Danial Baker published, "Drug Utilization Evaluation – Avoidance of insulin use errors," in the FMS in September.
Presentations
  • Pharmacotherapy Clinical Associate Professor Brenda Bray and Pharmacotherapy Clinical Associate Professor Lisa J. Woodard delivered a podium presentation at the AACP meeting in Grapevine, Texas titled, “Health care team challenge: Menus and immersion – innovative interprofessional education."
  • Brenda Bray and Pharmacotherapy Clinical Assistant Professor Megan Willson, with one co-author, represented three additional co-authors in the presentation of their interprofessional poster titled, "An intercollegiate inter-professional hybrid manikin-based simulation," at the International Association for Medical Education in Milan, Italy, on September 2, 2014. Pharmacy, nursing, physician assistants, and nutrition exercise physiology were all represented in the poster.
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Gregory Poon participated in the Washington State University College of Pharmacy Research Seminar Series presenting, "Molecular control of gene regulation: Potential, challenges, and solutions," on September 3, 2014.
  • Josh Neumiller presented “Practical applications of Pramlintide in Type 1 diabetes,” at the American Association of Diabetes Educators CORE Concepts conference in Chicago, IL on September 9, 2014.
Service
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor and Associate Dean of Graduate Education Kay Meier visited Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in early September as a member of the Science Policy Committee for the American Physiological Society. As part of this trip, she met with a staff member in Senator Maria Cantwell's office, and with congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers. The goal of the trip was to advocate for sustainable federal funding for biomedical research.
  • Experimental and Systems Pharmacology Adjunct Faculty Jeannie Padowski has been named the new IRB director for Washington State University.
Grants
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences Clinical Assistant Professor Travis Denton received a one-year grant in the amount of $15,000 beginning September 1, 2014, from the WSU Spokane Research Seed Grants Review Committee titled, "LCMSMS lanthionine ketimine assay."
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences Clinical Associate Professor Shuwen Wang received a West Association of Core Directors travel award to attend the 2014 West Associate of Core Directors annual meeting on September 11-12, 2014 in Davis, Calif.
 
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) students
  • Heidi Medford will present, “Absence of cardiac O-GlcNAc transferase reduces postoperative survival,” at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 2, 2014, as part of the Graduate Research Seminar Series.
  • Dustin Rae will present, “A Novel Shuttle Vector Approach to Identify Genes Involved in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Disorders using Vector-mediated Genotoxicity,” at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 9, 2014, as part of the Graduate Research Seminar Series.
  • Yili Zhong will present, “Characterization of distributional delays by hysteresis analysis,” at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 16, 2014, as part of the Graduate Research Seminar Series.
  • Ana Vergara will present, “UPLC Separation of Silybin A & B with Raloxifene and its Glucuronide Standards,” at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 23, 2014, as part of the Graduate Research Seminar Series.
  • Brandon Gufford will present, “Predicting an herb-drug interaction in virtual humans,” at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 30, 2014, as part of the Graduate Research Seminar Series.
Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students
  • James Leonard and faculty co-author Danial Baker published "Drug Evaluation – Umeclidinium (Incruse Ellipta)," in the FMS in September.
  • James Leonard and three faculty co-authors were highlighted by the journal Hospital Pharmacy in their newsletter, "Where these the Top 5 articles YOU read this summer?"
Coming Events
  • October 1, 2014
    Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Shobhan Gaddameedhi has been invited to present, “Role of the circardian clock in skin cancer prevention and sunburn erythema,” at the 13th Annual AACRE International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research on Wednesday, October 1, 2014, in New Orleans, La.
  • October 17, 2014
    Experimental and Systems Pharmacology Assistant Research Professor Vanessa González-Pérez has been invited to present, “The building blocks to become a successful leader: Identifying motivation and strengths, approaches to time management, increasing productivity, and application of transferable skills,” at the Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) National Conference in Los Angeles, Calif.
  • October 21, 2014
    Experimental and Systems Pharmacology Postdoctoral Research Associate John Barr has been invited to present, "From understanding to prediction: opportunities and challenges in modeling xenobiotic metabolism and disposition," during the symposium at the 19th North American International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics meeting in San Francisco, Calif.
  • November 14, 2014
    Experimental and Systems Pharmacology Professor Mary Paine will give a talk at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week titled, “Drug and nutrient interactions in kidney disease therapeutics,” in Philadelphia, Pa.

 
 
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